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Bonanza And Baron Pilot Recurrency Training

We are excited to partner for a second year with the Bonanza & Baron Pilot Training program! This clinic gives pilots an opportunity to work side by side with experienced CFIs to increase their knowledge and skill level, using their own aircraft. We specifically LOVE the Non Pilot Companion Clinic that offers some basic flight skills and knowledge for spouses or family members, making them safer and more informed passengers.

The BPT weekend clinics also give participants a chance to swap stories and learn from fellow Beechcraft pilots in a fun, relaxed setting. It’s a perfect blend of continuing education and weekend getaway fun!

To find out more information regarding the BPT follow the link to their website provided below.

Bonanza & Baron Pilot Training (BPT)

The Bonanza & Baron Pilot Training (BPT) offers weekend clinics of model and type specific training. The clinic offers Recurrent training, Biannual flight reviews(BFR), and Instrument Proficiency Checks(IPC) all done with their CFIs, using your own aircraft. You can choose from one of the following clinics:

The Type Specific Clinic discusses emergency procedures, aircraft systems, and the latest technologies and devices used today.

The Recurrent Clinic takes a look at fresh material and reviews the practical application of forced landings, icing, and engine management.

The Non Pilot Companion Clinic is designed specifically for non-pilot companions, including spouses, other family members or friends. It provides a greater understanding of the details encountered on every flight helping to increase the comfort level and increase the enjoyment of the flight.

According to their website, “When you participate in a weekend clinic, you’ll come away with much more than exceptional flight training. For 2 ½ days, you are with fellow aviators who share their experiences, their perspectives and their insights. The camaraderie of learning and socializing with other Beechcraft owners during the weekend is invaluable. In addition, attending a weekend clinic each year can have a positive impact on your insurance rates.”

To learn more about the program or to sign up for an upcoming clinic, visit their website at:

Bonanza & Baron Pilot Training Program

Another option Beechcraft owners have for recurrent training or just elective continuing education is the Beechcraft Pilot Proficiency Program (BPPP). Not to be confused with the BPT weekend program, the BPPP is primarily based online with an option to fly after course completion with an ABS designated flight instructor.

This online course is offered free of charge to all American Bonanza Society members. In addition to increasing your skills and knowledge, completing the course may also earn you a significant insurance discount.

Beechcraft Pilot Proficiency Program (BPPP)

The BPPP offers two course options, The Beechcraft Systems, Procedures and Techniques Course (“BPPP Initial”), and the The Beechcraft Pilot Skills Enhancement Course (“BPPP Recurrent”). Both courses are designed to help you better understand your aircraft by studying the systems, learning emergency procedure techniques and discussing critical decision.

The Beechcraft Systems, Procedures and Techniques Course (“BPPP Initial”) goes through your aircraft’s system, discusses how to better use them in normal, abnormal, and emergency situations.

The Beechcraft Pilot Skills Enhancement Course (“BPPP Recurrent”) teaches advanced techniques for emergency procedures, stalls and angel of attack, and reviews special use airspace.

According to the website, “BPPP instruction consists of online learning done at your own pace, followed by approximately four hours of flight instruction in your Beechcraft conducted by an expert, BPPP-standardized flight instructor, you schedule at your convenience near your home or desired training location.”

More information about the BPPP programs can be found on their website at:

Beechcraft Pilot Proficiency Program

 

Tips & Tricks to a Low-Cost Annual Inspection

An annual inspection does not have to be a high cost, high frustration event. By including preventative maintenance, communication, and continuity into your maintenance practice, your inspection cost could be reduced. Below are six tips and tricks we recommend to keep your cost low.

 

1. Practice Preventative Maintenance

-If you do proper maintenance throughout the year, you won’t end up with a TON of extra, little items that have to be completed at the annual inspection. For example if you have an oil leak or a small avionics issue on your Bonanza, bring it in and get the squawks fixed.

2. Have a Times Sheet

-Know when costly items are due. This will give you a realistic expectation of what to expect at your next annual. For example, the 72 month landing gear inspection on a Beechcraft King Air is a high dollar inspection. However, it is scheduled maintenance and can be prepared for by looking ahead on your times sheet.

3. Space out costly items

-When dealing with timed items on your aircraft, it may not always pay to wait until the 11th hour to have them complied with. If you have a 10 year prop overhaul due on your Beechcraft Baron, the same time as the 500 hr mag inspection, and the 10 year fuel & oil hoses are due, make a plan to space them out over the course of several inspections to spread out the cost. Inversely, you may choose to do them all during one annual inspection, and consolidate your expenses. You’ll have one expensive event, but the others will be much lower in cost. Planning ahead and figuring out the right option for you is key.

4. Talk to your mechanic

-Discuss what your objectives for the annual are. Do you need this to be a slim annual year, or do you want everything fixed to perfection.  Airworthiness items have to be complied with regardless; However, non safety concerns such as cosmetic items can be pushed back. Make a game plan so you are both on the same page.

5. Go Fly!

-This is by far the most enjoyable tip on the list, but it doesn’t make it any less important. It is well documented that the more you fly an airplane, the better condition the engine is going to stay in. So get out there and punch some holes in the clouds.

6. Have continuity in your maintenance

-By using the same mechanic shop a relationship is built, you get to know and trust your mechanic. Often the argument to this is the benefit gained by having a “fresh set of eyes.” While this is of some value, it could be argued that the benefit of developing trust with your mechanic and allowing them to build a relationship with both you and the aircraft far outweighs the alternative.

Of course, we know time is money. Some owner’s opt to keep their airplane flying as much as possible during the year, and come to terms with the idea of one big maintenance event every 12 months. The bottom line is, figure out what works for you and your budget, then communicate with your mechanic so you’re both on the same page.

Contact Double M Aviation for your next Low-Cost Annual Inspection